Take Action > Globalization

10% Income Shift

Ensure that 10% of what you spend is on local, ethically produced goods.

Due to globalization, foods and goods produced from miles away have become available and accessible at our local markets. Many of these goods can also be produced locally, yet our global economic system has made importing them in from other countries the most cost efficient – but not always the most environmentally sustainable or supportive of workers’ rights.

By creating a budget that allocates a percentage of how much we spend to local products, we encourage local businesses and workers, decrease our carbon footprints, while learning more about the production and distribution of the things we buy.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Globalization, Sweatshops

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Attend an Event: "It Starts With Me"Created by Zoe

“It Starts With Me” is a free youth dialogues event focused on combatting discrimination through active witnessing happening from 10am – 5pm on Saturday July 14th at the Vancouver Central Public Library.

There will be workshops in the morning, which will foster discussion about hate crimes, fear and causes of discrimination through art, theatre and brainstorming. Lunch will be provided, and after lunch a guest speaker, Romi Chandra, a community activist, will also be addressing the group. This will be followed by several dialogue sessions, and the day will finish with a flash mob.

The Minister of State for Multiculturalism, John Yap, will also be dropping by to share some of his experience with multiculturalism and combatting discrimination as well.

For more information, please check out our links:
Website – http://itstartswithmepromot.wix.com/itstartswithme#!home/mainPage
Facebook Event – http://www.facebook.com/events/378500512199931/
Twitter – https://twitter.com/#!/Itstartswithme_
Registration – http://tinyurl.com/d8g5vra

Goals

  1. We want to spread awareness about discrimination and the fact that it is still a problem, and how to not just be a bystander, but an active witness.
  2. We want to create an environment where people feel willing to share their experiences about discrimination.
  3. We want to provide youth with a way to find out more about ways to combat discrimination.
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Aware-a-Fair: A take-action, global issues focused event Created by Zoe

What: The Aware-a-Fair is a take-action global issues event focused on education, aimed at inspiring people of all ages to put their passion into action and try to change the world. The theme of the event really is promoting change, and causes will be represented that fight for everything from universal education to the environment.

When: Saturday May 19th 2012, from 9:30am – 6:00pm

Where: Lougheed Town Centre, Burnaby, British Columbia

Mission Statement: The goal of the Aware-a-Fair is to spread our passion for raising awareness about global issues to everyone we can, through a fun opportunity for the public, especially youth, to learn about a variety of philanthropic focused topics.

How: Each non-profit organizations or student group attending will present their cause and initiatives at a booth, giving the public a one-stop shop to delve into a variety of global issues.

Who: We aim to bring in about 200-300 youth from all over the Lower Mainland, in addition to reaching people who are already at the centre.

Media:
Like us on Facebook? = http://www.facebook.com/pages/Aware-A-Fair/301378149919085
RSVP here! = http://www.facebook.com/events/460480953968581/
Website! = http://www.wix.com/awareafair/aware-a-fair#
Twitter! = https://twitter.com/#!/Aware_a_Fair
Tumblr! = http://awareafair.tumblr.com/

Special Guests:
Mayor Derek Corrigan of Burnaby will be speaking at the event!
Student Speakers:
Zoya Jiwa
Selin Jessa
Latifa Abdillah
Allie Graham
Veronika Bylicki

Music: featuring . . . .
Saul Chabot

Organizations Attending:
Health for Humanity
Students Without Borders
SDC Blue Ribbon Foundation
Canadian Women for Afghanistan
Students CAN
Green Peace
Aga Khan Foundation
TAP Bottles
United Nations Association – Vancouver
WHISCA (Willing Hearts International Society)
TRAS (Trans Himalayan Aid Society)
Youth4tap
Students
Oxfam
Cuso International
CFMUN
Free the Children/Me to We
Global Stewardship Program at Capilano University
Room to Read
McReary Society’s Youth Advisory Council
Global Family
BC MUN
Pinetree Secondary School Red Cross Club

Goals

  1. We want to spread awareness about the work that is being done in BC by students and professionals to make a difference in the world.
  2. We want to inspire people, with our main demographic being youth, to not only educate themselves on these issues, but to continue to, or start to create change.
  3. Give organizations an opportunity to educate the public about what they have been doing.
  4. Put on a fun, free event that will bring the community together!
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Boycott

Boycott a product or brand by refusing to purchase or use/wear it.

Boycotting products is a simple way to actively resist consuming products that are produced with sweatshop labour. Resistance is always stronger in numbers: educate your friends/classmates about sweatshops and boycott a product or brand together. Make noise about your action by blogging about it, sharing it on Facebook or telling a local newspaper!

Check out these Successful Boycotts

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Globalization, Media Awareness, Sweatshops

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Clothing Swap

With a group, organize a clothing swap where you exchange clothes you no longer wear for new clothes from your friends’ closets.

Sweatshops – where children, youth, and adults are employed at low wages and in hazardous environments – exist because of consumer demands that enable large corporations to exploit labour to make profit. The more products we consume that are produced by these companies, the more incentive we give them to continue to use sweatshop labour.

Take a stand; instead of going shopping, next time host a clothing swap with your friends. You will finally clean up that closet your parents are nagging you about and end up with new clothes for free! By swapping items in your wardrobe, you are choosing not to purchase something made in a sweatshop and supporting human rights.

Suggested Steps

  1. Choose a location (your house will do just fine for a group of friends!);
  2. Spread the word via social networks and word-of-mouth;
  3. Gather up the clothes that you would like to contribute to the swap;
  4. Prepare some food or make it a potluck;
  5. Set up a few swapping ground rules (clothing should be clean, in good condition, etc.) and decide how the swap will work (is it auction style or does everyone get a turn?);
  6. Swap!
  7. Donate the un-swapped items to your local thrift store.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Globalization, Sweatshops

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Create a Short Film

Create a short film to post on Youtube/Vimeo to raise public awareness about globalization and its impact.

Globalization and the Internet have revolutionized the power and reach of media. Content that is produced all over the world is available for us to view with the click of a button. Not only does this help us spread ideas, but also exchange them.

A great way to raise awareness about an issue or spread an idea is through producing media that can be shared online. Be creative and make a video that defines what globalization is or outlines the impacts of globalization. This is a great action to do with a class, or a group of friends! Post your video online and use other social networking sites to promote it (Facebook, Twitter, Blog, etc.). See how many views you get!

Vimeo has a series of simple, informative videos as part of its Vimeo Video School. This video, Video 101, covers the basics of filming and editing short films.

Related Workshops

Globalization, Media Awareness

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Darn Your SocksCreated by Lillian

In the workshop, we talked about how our society has become so accustomed to disposable things. When something breaks, we throw it out. It is amazing how many people see a hole in a t-shirt or sock, for example, and think that it can no longer be worn. For this action, we suggest repairing something instead of throwing it away. One great way to do that is to learn to darn your socks. If you have a sock with a hole in it, darn it! There are lots of darning instructions online or, if you’re lucky, you might be able to ask your parents or grandparents about how to darn. It used to be a really common skill!

Goals

  1. To repair and reuse an item instead of throwing it away.
  2. To learn new skills from another generation.
  3. To raise awareness of a simple action (darning) on a big issue (globalization)
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Fair Trade Bake Sale

Raise awareness about the impact of trade by hosting a fair trade bake sale.

Trade regulations impact countries and people economically, politically, and socially. As government regulation decreases due to free trade agreements, corporate control increases. This often results in the disregard for worker’s rights, environmental sustainability, and human rights.

Fair trade ensures that people who are producing goods and foods are compensated fairly and decreases the gap between corporate profit and a worker’s wage. By hosting a fair trade bake sale you can bring people together while educating them about issues around trade and the definition of fair trade.

Suggested Steps

  1. Schedule a date and time for the bake sale – talk to a teacher, administrator, or student council member at your school to ask about scheduling;
  2. Create a menu. Check out Fair Trade Canada for some ideas or be creative and do some substitution. Common Fair Trade ingredients include chocolate, sugar, coffee, bananas, spices, pineapple, and more.
  3. Buy your ingredients. Check out Fair Trade Vancouver for suggestions of where to find fair trade products in Vancouver. When fair trade products are not available, look for local products or other examples of “fairly traded” products – they may not always have a label.
  4. Bake away!
  5. Set up your table (include some information about fair trade and the ingredients that you used) and sell your treats. Be sure to save some for yourself!

Related Workshop

Food Justice, Globalization

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Farmer's Market Feast

Make a farmers’ market feast with locally grown produce to share with family and friends.

Visit a farmer’s market near you with your friends and family. Create your own menu and ensure that all your main ingredients are locally grown. Have a blast picking out fruits and vegetables at the market; ask questions about where and how the food was grown. Then, enjoy cooking up a storm before you finally have a delicious locally grown feast.

Check out some of Vancouver’s farmer’s markets here.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Globalization

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Hold a Documentary Screening

Invite people to watch a documentary on the impact of media.

There are several documentaries out that address the impact of media. Many of them discuss issues about gender representations, consumerism, and social stratification.

Choose a documentary to screen at school or host a screening for your friends and family at home. Create discussion questions for the group to answer after watching the film.

Suggested Steps

  1. Choose a documentary film;
  2. Choose a date, time, and location;
  3. Spread the word through social networks;
  4. Prepare for the screening: make some snacks or suggest that others bring a dish, watch the film beforehand, develop discussion questions for a conversation after the film;
  5. Watch the movie;
  6. Discuss your questions.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Gender Representations, Globalization, Health Care, Income Inequality, Media Awareness

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Produce Your Own Media

Create your own media – a blog, a Zine, a video – to share your perspectives and opinions.

Although media often produces negative messages that tell us how to view ourselves and the world, we can take back control of the media by producing our own!

If you have something to say, or an idea to share, multi-media outlets have made it very easy for us to produce our own media and the Internet has made is easy to distribute. Create a video, Zine, Blog, or song and share it with your online social networks.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Globalization, Income Inequality, Media Awareness, Sweatshops

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Start a "Meatless Monday"Created by Sydney

Encourage the people you eat with to ditch meat once a week, and enjoy the benefits it has on their health, world hunger, and the environment.

Simply ask others to bring/buy something other than meat for their lunches, and enjoy a day of vegetarian meals once a week. Let others know that they’re doing good for animals, themselves, and the environment. Going meat-free once a week is not only a good way to reduce your carbon footprint, but to raise awareness of how poorly animals are treated for food.

Goals

  1. Raise awareness of the benefits of eating less meat.
  2. Engage others in learning about their food and what is in it.
  3. Create conversations about how animals are treated for food.

Start your own ApothecaryCreated by Kelsey

Plant medicine is a lot less toxic for the earth, and for your body. The practices of pharmaceutical companies can be dirty, and they are invasive. Doctors are often quick to write prescriptions, and we live in an increasingly pill-dependent society. If we learn to better understand them, and take care of them, plants can work as our allies to help balance our health and well-being. Making medicine with plants is simpler than one might expect, and it is a great way to form stronger connections within our communities.

Goals

  1. Plant and Identify Medicinals
  2. Learn their benefits and needs
  3. Learn to make tinctures, salves, vinegars and offer them to those in need
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The 100-Mile Diet

Challenge yourself to only eat locally grown food!

The 100 mile diet was developed by Alisa Smith and JB Mackinnon, a Vancouver duo who decided to only eat food that was grown in a 100 mile radius from where they lived, for a year! They wrote about their experience in a book they published, The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating.
Borrow the book from your public library and find out if you’re up for the challenge. Try it out for a week, ask a friend to join you. You can also write about your experience on a blog, or create a video diary.

For more information on eating locally, check out Farm Folk City Folk.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Globalization

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Volunteer some time and sweat at a local farmCreated by Jamee

I just volunteered at the Richmond Sharing Farm this past week and learned SO MUCH about farming, farmers, the local movement towards agriculture, and how to avoid slug infestation! :)
The Sharing Farm grows all kinds of vegetables and some fruits, and donates all of their produce to the Richmond Food Bank, so they have more than just canned goods to provide to children and families. Apparently Richmond has one of the highest child poverty rates! This farm provides them the opportunity to be eating fresh and healthy local foods.

I would highly recommend organizing a volunteer day at the farm. They’re always looking for help!

Goals

  1. Help a great organization do good for the community.
  2. Awareness - for the farm itself, for the plight of farmers, for the importance of local food systems
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Write to a Member of Parliament

Write a letter to your MP and tell them what is important to you.

We elect MPs into government in hopes that they will speak on our behalf on the issues and problems that concern us as citizens. Even if you may not be of legal voting age, you can still voice your opinion and let your MP know what is important to you. You can also write to Canada’s Minister for the Environment, Peter Kent,  and share your ideas on what Canada should do to protect the environment. Some people have said that for a politician, a letter from one person counts for the voices of 1,000 others who didn’t get around to writing the letter (with hand-written letters and original letters being given even more weight than e-mails).

Find your representative here.

Related Workshops

Climate Change, Food Justice, Globalization, Health Care, Income Inequality,

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